Puertas este - Mezquita Córdoba

The gates on the eastern side run along Calle del Magistrado González Francés. From north to south are the following:

The Puerta de la Grada Redonda is one of the access gates to the patio de los Naranjos (Orange Tree Courtyard). Its current appearance, in the Churrigueresque style, dates from 1738.

The Fountain of Santa Catalina is an 18th-century fountain attached to the eastern wall, next to the gate of the same name. It is also known as the Mocosillo fountain. It consists of a large basin-abravadero, topped on its frontispiece by a niche that is currently empty.

The Gate of Santa Catalina is one of the access gates to the Orange Tree Courtyard. It is named after its proximity to the former convent of Santa Catalina. In Renaissance style, it was built in the 16th century by the architect Hernán Ruiz II. It is made up of two sections. The lower section is made up of a semicircular arch with the keystone highlighted by a coat of arms flanked by two columns resting on a plinth. The alfiz created by the columns and the strong entablature contains two coats of arms, the one on the left of which is a relief of the mosque's minaret. The upper section is organised by four columns that create blind lintelled openings in which wall paintings, now lost, would have been placed. The whole is crowned with a rounded tympanum with relief decoration on its pediment.

The Puerta de San Juan is named after the chapel of San Juan Bautista, which is on the other side of the door.84 It was restored in 1913 by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco.

The Baptistery Door is named after the Baptistery chapel on the other side of the door.84 It was restored in 1913 by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco.

The Gate of St. Nicholas is named after the chapel of St. Nicholas of Bari, which is on the other side of the gate. It was restored in 1913 by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco.

The Puerta de la Concepción Antigua is named after the former chapel of Nuestra Señora de la Concepción, which was located on the other side of the gate. It was restored in 1913 by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco.

The Gate of San José is named after the chapel of San José, which is located on the other side of the gate. It was restored in 1913 by the architect Ricardo Velázquez Bosco.

The Puerta del Sagrario is so called because of its proximity to the Sagrario chapel.

And finally, you can visit the Puerta de Jerusalén (Jerusalem Gate).

Article obtained from Wikipedia article Wikipedia in his version of 01/07/2022, by various authors under the license Licencia de Documentación Libre GNU.